Inaugural Speeches

John Fitzgerald Kennedy
John Fitzgerald Kennedy
John Fitzgerald Kennedy John Fitzgerald Kennedy 35th president of the United States, the youngest person ever to be elected president. He was also the first Roman Catholic president and the first president to be born in the 20th century. Kennedy was assassinated before he completed his third year as president. Therefore his achievements were limited. Nevertheless, his influence was worldwide, and his handling of the Cuban Missile Crisis may have prevented war. Young people especially liked him.
Thomas Woodrow Wilson
Thomas Woodrow Wilson
Thomas Woodrow Wilson Thomas Woodrow Wilson, twenty-eighth president of the United States, might have suffered from dyslexia. He never could read easily, but developed a strong power of concentration and a near-photographic memory. The outbreak of World War I coincided with the death of Wilson's first wife Ellen Axson, who he was passionately devoted to. Seven months after her death his friends introduced him to Edith Bolling Galt, a descendant of the Indian princess Pocahontas, they were marrie
Summary Of President John F. Kennedy?s Inaugural Address
Summary Of President John F. Kennedy?s Inaugural Address
Summary of President John F. Kennedy?s Inaugural Address This inaugural speech establishes what John F. Kennedy?s vision is for the United States--actually it is more of a world vision--of global unity, supporting freedom and human rights for all humankind. He suggests that we should all celebrate in this time of freedom. Man holds all of the power in his hands. Yet, there are still revolutionary beliefs being fought around the world. He does not want us to forget that we are all apart of this r
Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt Outline Thesis: Theodore Roosevelt's political presence altered the course of the United States, transforming it into a superpower fully ready to handle the challenges of any opposition, and changed the role of the president and executive branch of US government, making it a force to be reckoned with. I. Introduction II. Before Roosevelt A. Post-Reconstructionist Views B. The Industrial Revolution C. The Gilded Age 1. Railroads 2. Robber Barons 3. Immigration 4. Standard Quest