Enzyme Concentration

Human Immunodeficiency Virus
Human Immunodeficiency Virus
Human Immunodeficiency Virus The topic of this paper is the human immunodeficiency virus, HIV, and whether or not mutations undergone by the virus allow it to survive in the immune system. The cost of treating all persons with AIDS in 1993 in the United States was $7.8 billion, and it is estimated that 20,000 new cases of AIDS are reported every 3 months to the CDC. This question dealing with how HIV survives in the immune system is of critical importance, not only in the search for a cure for t
Dementia
Dementia
Dementia What is Dementia? Dementia is an organic brain syndrome which results in global cognitive impairments. Dementia can occur as a result of a variety of neurological diseases. Some of the more well known dementing diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), multi-infarct dementia (MID), and Huntington's disease (HD). Throughout this essay the emphasis will be placed on AD (also known as dementia of the Alzheimer's type, and primary degenerative dementia), because statistically it is the mos
Active Transport
Active Transport
Active Transport Since the cell membrane is somewhat permeable to sodium ions, simple diffusion would result in a net movement of sodium ions into the cell, until the concentrations on the two sides of the membrane became equal. Sodium actually does diffuse into the cell rather freely, but as fast as it does so, the cell actively pumps it out again, against the concentration difference. The mechanism by which the cell pumps the sodium ions out is called active transport. Active transport require
Digestion and Absorption
Digestion and Absorption
Introduction The key issue in the digestion and absorption of fats is one of solubility. Lipids are hydrophobic, and thus are poorly soluble in the aqueous environment of the digestive tract. The digestive enzyme, lipase, is water soluble and can only work at the surface of fat globules. Digestion is greatly aided by emulsification, the breaking up of fat globules into much smaller emulsion droplets. Bile salts and phospholipids are amphipathic molecules that are present in the bile. Motility in
Investigating the Effect of Lipase Concentration on the Breakdown of F
Investigating the Effect of Lipase Concentration on the Breakdown of F
Investigating the Effect of Lipase Concentration on the Breakdown of Fat in Milk INTRODUCTION: Enzymes are proteins which can catalyse chemical reactions without changing themselves. The enzyme lipase breaks down the fat in dairy products such as full-cream milk for people who are lactose intolerant. Lipase acts on its specific substrate, lipids produces fatty acids. If enzyme concentration increases, random collisions between the substrates and active sites of enzyme increase due to the increas
Investigating an enzyme controlled reaction: catalase and hydrogen per
Investigating an enzyme controlled reaction: catalase and hydrogen per
Investigating an enzyme controlled reaction: catalase and hydrogen peroxide concentration Objectives to investigate the effect of substrate concentration on the activity of catalase to evaluate a practical protocol Procedure SAFETY: Wear eye protection and protect clothing from hydrogen peroxide. Rinse splashes of peroxide and pureed potato off the skin as quickly as possible... Investigation a Use the large syringe to measure 20 cm3 pureed potato into the conical flask. b Put the bung secur
Enzymatic Reaction in a Reaction
Enzymatic Reaction in a Reaction
The purpose of this part of the experiment is to find out the course of an enzymatic reaction in a reaction. In order to do this, a measurement of the amount of substrate disappearing over time increments of 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, and 360 seconds had taken. In this experiment we see that as time progressive the enzymatic rate lowered. The highest rate is the first in the first time interval (0-10) . It was the highest because iit had the highest catalysis amount and the most amount of H2O2 to
IB Biology syllabus  definitions
IB Biology syllabus definitions
IB Biology syllabus definitions * Definition given in IB Biology syllabus TOPIC WORD DEFINITION Topic 1: Cells Organelle A discrete structure within a cell, with a specific function.* Tissue A group of cells similar to each other, along with their associated intercellular substances, which perform the same function within a multicellular organism. Organ A group of tissues which work together as a single unit to perform a particular function within a multicellular organism. Organ system A group
Effect of Different Concentrations of Enzyme on Enzyme Activity
Effect of Different Concentrations of Enzyme on Enzyme Activity
Mashrek International School Effect of Different Concentrations of Enzyme on Enzyme Activity What is the effect of changing the concentration of lipase enzyme on the enzyme activity in catalyzing lipids in whole milk? Naim Al-Haj Ali MYP Year 4B  Aim: To investigate the effect of changing the concentration of lipase enzyme (2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, 10%) on the rate of enzyme activity in catalyzing lipids in whole milk (5cm3), by measuring the pH of the solution before and after adding the enzyme, keepin
Stage 2: Human BiologySummative Practical: Pepsin
Stage 2: Human BiologySummative Practical: Pepsin
Stage 2: Human BiologySummative Practical: Pepsin Background Information: What are enzymes and how they work?Enzymes are necessary proteins that are crucial in the maintenance and activity of life. CITATION Amaed l 1033 (Inc, Undated). Enzymes increase the rate of a chemical reaction without itself undergoing any permanent chemical change. All chemical reactions that occur within a living organism rely on the catalytic actions of enzymes, which is why enzymes are called Biotransformation. Curre
Lipase
Lipase
Background information: Enzymes are biological molecules (proteins) that act as catalysts and help complex reactions occur. The enzyme grabs on to the substrate at a special area called the active site. The combination is called the enzyme/substrate complex. Enzymes are very specific and don\'t just grab on to any molecule. The active site is a specially shaped area of the enzyme that fits around the substrate. The activity of enzymes is affected by three factors; temperature, concentration, and
Conclusions - concentration affecting lipase
Conclusions - concentration affecting lipase
Conclusions - concentration affecting lipase It is clear from the graphs, tables and statistical processes carried out that generally, increasing the volume of lipase increases the change in pH of the solution and also the rate of change of the pH of the solution. This has been proved by the increasing values of standard deviation for higher volumes of lipase, the generally larger maximum change in pH for the higher volumes of lipase and also by the shape and gradients of the graphs drawn. Alth
Factors Which Influence t he Rates of Reaction
Factors Which Influence t he Rates of Reaction
Factors Which Influence t he Rates of Reaction Introduction The purpose of this lab is to research the factors which makes the rates of reaction to change. The meaning of rate of reaction is how fast it takes for a chemical reaction to occur. Some factors that affect the rate of reactions are the nature of the chemical reactant which is the chemical formation of the substance we use determines how fast it will react. The concentration of reactant which is if the reactant concentration is increa
INTRODUCTION
INTRODUCTION
INTRODUCTION The Minamata Convention on Mercury is named after Minamata, a city in Japan where serious health damage occurred as a result of mercury pollution in the mid-20th Century. Minamata is known worldwide due to Minamata disease, a neurological disorder caused by mercury poisoning. The disease was discovered in 1956. It was caused by the release of methyl mercury in the industrial wastewater from a local chemical factory, which continued from 1932 to 1968. This highly toxic chemical bio-
Internal Assessment ( IA ) Lab Report Guide
Internal Assessment ( IA ) Lab Report Guide
Internal Assessment ( IA ) Lab Report Guide IB Biology - Mr. McGee Your internal assessment (IA) lab report is a professional document based on your accumulation of knowledge and abilities to act and function as a scientist. I know it is time consuming, but you are the scientist and we are excited to see your results! Have fun as you partake in the joy of being an independent scientist. You will produce a single typed document (typically 6-12 pages long) that will be assessed by myself as well
Topic 2 IB TB questions and answers
Topic 2 IB TB questions and answers
The answers/markschemes are below each question. You can reorganize the document so that you do not see the answer/markschemes when you answer the questions. 1. Outline the process of endocytosis. (Total 5 marks) (Annotated diagram illustrating the process may be used to gain some or all the marks.) the mechanism whereby cells take in solids and / or solutions; involves the formation of vesicles; infolding of cell membrane; called phagocytosis when solids / organisms are engulfed; phagocytosis i