Chicago Riot Of 1919

World War I race
World War I race
World War I race Olamide Yussuf 10/10/2010 History 157 Dr. Kathleen Sander After World War I, America began transitioning into a modern era, which changed America forever. The 1920s saw drastic political and social revolution in the United States. The ending of World War I also began advances in technology that led to economic growth. ?The first Industrial Revolution century had catapulted the United State into the forefront among the world?s richest and most developed nations? (Divine, 720). Th
Chicago riots
Chicago riots
HIS-2020G The importance of little factors that can lead up to becoming huge and having great effects on actions. For blacks and whites both the riot was just a built up increase of hostility that has been going on for quite some time. One thing can be said though that the Chicago incidents seem to be the more ruthless and aggressive when compared to others. It may have been because of the blacks’ resiliency not to lie down and to fight back. A lot of the time it causes even more anger to mix wh
Chicago Race Riot 1919
Chicago Race Riot 1919
Dr. Edmund F. Wehrle His-2020G Chicago Race Riot 1919 On July 27, 1919, a young black man named Eugene Williams swam past an invisible line of segregation at a popular public beach on Lake Michigan, Chicago. He was stoned by several white bystanders, knocked unconscious and drowned, and his death set off one of the bloodiest riots in Chicago’s history. The Chicago race riot was not the result of the incident alone. Several factors, including the economic, social and political differences betwee
The Chicago Defender was a newspaper that defended
The Chicago Defender was a newspaper that defended
The Chicago Defender was a newspaper that defended race against violence and issues that America didn't discuss that would resolve for the African Americans. The Newspaper was founded by, Robert S. Abott on May 5, 1905(as cited in Chicago Defender). Abott started celling his newspapers for a very low price, working in a small kitchen. Since the paper was a northern newspaper he had more freedom to attack racial issues. With Abotts dramatic headlines and graphic images, he got his readers attent