Antigone

Themes
Themes
Themes The three major themes are love, loyalty, and irony; the most major theme being irony. Antigone's love for her brother, Polyneices, was so strong, she died for him. Haemon's love for Antigone was so strong, he died with her death. Eurydice's love for her son, Haemon, was so strong, she died with his death. Creon's guilt and love for his wife and son was so strong, he felt he should not go on living after their death. . . . I speak for you, for me, and for the spirits of the dead. . . The
Antigone
Antigone
Antigone In Ancient Greece, new ideals surfaced as answers to life?s complicated questions. These new beliefs were centered on the expanding field of science. Man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. A government that was ruled by the people was suggested as opposed to a monarchy that had existed for many years. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in city-states. These new ideals, though good in intentions, often conflicted with each other creating complex moral
Sophocles Antigone
Sophocles Antigone
Sophocles' Antigone The debate over who is the tragic hero in Antigone continue on to this day. The belief that Antigone is the hero is a strong one. There are many critics who believe, however, that Creon, the Ruler of Thebes, is the true protagonist. I have made my own judgments also, based on what I have researched of this work by Sophocles. Antigone is widely thought of as the tragic hero of the play bearing her name. She would seem to fit the part in light of the fact that she dies in doing
Antigone
Antigone
Antigone Sophocles' trilogy of Oedipus the King, Oedipus at Colonus, and Antigone is a powerful, tragic tale that examines the nature of human guilt, fate and punishment. Creon, Oedipus' uncle and brother-in-law, is the story's most dynamic character. His character experiences a drastic metamorphosis through the span of the three dramas. Creon's vision of a monarch's proper role, his concept of and respect for justice, as well as his respect for the design evolve considerably by the trilogy's tr
Antigone - Analysis Of Greek Ideals
Antigone - Analysis Of Greek Ideals
Antigone - Analysis of Greek Ideals In Ancient Greece, new ideals surfaced as answers to life's complicated questions. These new beliefs were centered around the expanding field of science. Man was focused on more than the Gods or heavenly concerns. A government that was ruled by the people was suggested as opposed to a monarchy that had existed for many years. Freedom of religion was encouraged to be exercised in city-states. These new ideals, though good in intentions, often conflicted with ea
The Tragedy Of Hamlet
The Tragedy Of Hamlet
The Tragedy of Hamlet Arguably the best piece of writing ever done by William Shakespeare, Hamlet the is the classic example of a tragedy. In all tragedies the hero suffers, and usually dies at the end. Othello stabs himself, Romeo and Juliet commit suicide, Brutis falls on his sword, and like them Hamlet dies by getting cut with a poison tipped sword. But that is not all that is needed to consider a play a tragedy, and sometimes a hero doesn't even need to die. Making Not every play in which a
Conflicting Values In Antigone
Conflicting Values In Antigone
Conflicting Values in Antigone In the play Antigone by Sophocles, Creon and Antigone have distinct conflicting values. Creon's regard for the laws of the city causes him to abandon all other beliefs. He feels that all should obey the laws set forth by him, even if other beliefs, moral or religious, state otherwise. Antigone, on the other hand, hold the beliefs of the gods in high reverence. She feels that the laws of the gods should be obeyed above all others, especially when in respect to fam