Lewis Carroll in Wonderland

I. Through the writings of Lewis Carroll in the story Alice in Wonderland the difference between fantasy and reality can be seenthrough the eyes of a child. The stories created by Carroll are a combination of make believe stories made to entertain children he talked to on an almost daily basis. Seen as odd by adults in society Carroll better associated himself with children because of his stammering disability when speaking.
A. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson

B. Alice in Wonderland

C. Impressions

II. Charles Lutwidge Dodgeson

A. Talents

B. Pseudonym of Dodgson

1. Inspiration of Alice

III. Alice in Wonderland

A. Fantasy vs. Reality

1. Interpretation of Alice

a. Growning-up

b. Alice's feelings

2. True Fantasy

B. Imagery

IV. Impressions

A. Impact on society

1. Interest of society

2. Ability to learn more






























Jennifer Stark

Mr. Desormier

English 12 Honors

March 23, 1998


Lewis Carroll In Wonderland

Through the writing of Lewis Carroll in the story Alice in Wonderland

the difference between fantasy and reality can be seen through the eyes of

a child. The stories created by Carroll are a combination of make believe stories made to entertain children he talked to on an almost daily basis. Seen as odd by adults in society Carroll better associated himself with children because of his stammering disability when speaking.

Carroll the man of many talents was born Charles Lutwidge Dodgson on January 27, 1832. Out of a family of eleven children Dodgson was the oldest son and third child. As a child he was very academic and had many interest which he pursued after becoming a deacon in the Church of England. His many accomplishments include Mathematician, English logician, photographer, and novelist ("Carroll, Lewis").

From the imagination of Lewis Carroll came Alice in Wonderland and many books like it created for children. These books have been compared and interpreted by adults around the world to get a better understanding of who Carroll was as a person. For ages children have enjoyed reading about Alice and her adventure but that story is not the only thing accredited to Carroll.

Carroll the man of many talents was born Charles Lutwidge Dodgson on January 27, 1832. Out of a family of eleven children Dodgson was the oldest son and third child. As a child he was very academic and had many interest which he pursued after becoming a deacon in the Church of England. His many accomplishments include mathematician, english logician, photographer, and novelist (Cohen 52-3).

Later in life while writing humorous works he used the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. Dodgson arrived at this pen name by taking his own name Charles Lutwidge, and translating it into Latin as Carolus Ludovicus, then reversing and retranslating them in to English. The pen name he used only for nonacadmemic works. He then in turn used his real name when writing books on mathematics such as Euclid and His Modern Rivals (1879) which is one of historical interest ("Carroll, Lewis").

Carroll's inspiration to write Alice in Wonderland came from his entertaining of the Liddell children. Under the supervision of the governess, Carroll read stories to entertain them on their visits to his college room, where he taught mathematics. The children's father was dean of Christ Church College where Carroll taught (Hudson 264). Alice Liddell the oldest of the children was the one who begged Carroll to write the Alice Adventure's out, he did so and gave it to her. When handing the finished product to Alice he never gave any thought about hearing about it again. In weeks to come Henry Kingsley the novelist picked up the story while sitting in the drawing room of the Liddell house. When Kingsley finished reading about Alice and her Adventurers he urged Mrs. Liddell to persuade the author to publish it. Carroll impressed by Kingsley's suggestion consulted his friend George MacDonald. MacDonald read it to his children, in which they thoroughly enjoyed it and wished for "60,000 volumes of it." Carroll then revised it and published it in 1865 ("Carroll, Lewis").

It was all very well to say 'DRINK ME,' but the wise little Alice was not going to do that in a hurry. 'No, I'll look first,' she said 'and see whether it's marked "poison" or not'; for she had read several nice little histories about children who had got burnt, and eaten up by wild beasts and other unpleasant things, all because they would not remember the simple rules their friends had taught them: such as, that a red-poker will burn you if you hold it too long; and that if you cut