Lady Macbeth's Character in Macbeth.



Lady Macbeth's Character in Macbeth.
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Introduction
Macbeth Lady Macbeth's Character in Macbeth Lady Macbeth is a controversial figure. She is seen by some as a woman of strong will who is ambitious for herself and who is astute enough to recognise her husband's strengths and weaknesses, and ruthless enough to exploit them. They see her in her commitment to evil and in her realisation that the acquisition of the Crown has not brought her the hapipiness she had expected, and finally, as one who breaks down nuder the strain. Others see her as a woman ambitious for her husband whom she loves. She recognises the essential good in him, and feels that, without her, he will never win the Crown. She allies herself with the powers of darkness for his sake, but here inherent(congenital) femininity breaks down under the strain of the unnatural murder of Duncan and the alienation of her husband. She can see what must be done; he visualises the consequence. "fiend-like queen" To Macbeth, in his letter to her, she is his "dearest partner of greatness", an indication of love and trust. Overcome By Ambition - she calls on the powers of evil to unsex her and make her cruel and to fill her full of "direst cruelty" "Had he not resembled My father as he slept, I had done't" does this imply that she is still a woman with a woman's tendernesss? Is she alloy by exploiting his love for her when she makes his consent to murder a test of his love? Is she being cynical when she inverts logic and reality in asking him if he is afraid to be what he wants to be and in suggesting that to be a true man he must take what he wants She is aware, too, that dwelling on the moral aspect of the murder "will make us mad". The Better Criminal? - She seems to be the better criminal; she remembers the details that Macbeth has overlooked, "Why did you bring these daggers from the place?"...read more.
Middle
In this same dialogue, she also says "you shall put...into my despatch," which furthermore proves that she is leading Macbeth into believing that he will have no physical role in the murder of the king. Lady Macbeth thinks this strategy will work because she describes Macbeth as a man who "wouldst not play false, And yet would wrongly win;" Imagery in Macbeth In all of Shakespeare's plays he uses many forms of imagery. Imagery, the art of making images, the products of imagination. In the play 'Macbeth' Shakespeare applies the imagery of clothing, darkness and blood. (listed from least to most), Each detail is his imagery, it seems to contain an important symbol of the play. Symbols that the reader must understand if they are to interpret either the passage or the play as a whole. Within the play 'Macbeth' the imagery of clothing portrays that Macbeth is seeking to hide his "disgraceful self" from his eyes and others. Shakespeare wants to keep alive the ironical contrast between the wretched creature that Macbeth really is and the disguises he assumes to conceal the fact. In opinion, the reader thinks of the play honors as garments to be worn; likewise, Macbeth is constantly represented symbolically as the wearer of robes not belonging to him. He is wearing an undeserved dignity, which is a crucial point that Shakespeare has made. The description of the purpo se of clothing in Macbeth is the fact that these garments are not his. Therefore, Macbeth is uncomfortable in them because he is continually conscious of the fact that they do not belong to him. In the following passage, the idea constantly recurs that Macbeth's new honors sit ill upon him, like loose and badly fitting garments, belonging to someone else: "New honours come upon him, Like our strange garments, cleave not to their mould, But with the aid of use."(Act I, iii: 144) ...read more.
Conclusion
He tells himself that Duncan is good and kind and that killing him will provoke a tremendous out cry. Duncan's goodness will "plead like angels, trumpeted-tongued ". If Macbeth murders him he will be condemned to 'deep damnation'. Macbeth tells Lady Macbeth that he will not murder