Jungian Archetypes: Dunstan – The Innocent, the Caregiver, and the Explorer
Mrs. Dempster – The Caregiver
Boy – The Rebel
Leola – The Lover
Paul – The Magician
Theme: Obsessive minds often alienate us from society.
Mapping Statement: Dunstan’s obsession with Mrs. Dempster, secrets, and saints, absorbs a large portion of his life, add to his inability to maintain meaningful relationships, and lead him to his failure of friendship.
Proof 1: “I became an unofficial watchdog to the Dempster family which was often a nuisance and did nothing for my popularity” (pg.14). Despite his realization that the noble act kept him from developing a popular social life with other children, he continued to take care of Mrs. Dempster for he knew that it would take time to rid of his guilt.
Proof 2: Visits to the Dempsters becomes a daily ‘chore’ for him as he became more attached to Mrs. Dempster in a way where he accepts that he is obsessed with her and that he is the only person truly capable of looking after her; "Leola I wanted as a trophy of success, but Mrs. Dempster was beginning to fill my whole life, and the stranger her conduct became, and the more the village pitied and dismissed her, the worse my obsession grew” (pg.15).
Proof 3: Years pass, and Dunstan is more obsessed and devoted to Mrs. Dempster than he ever was before; he did not allow Boy to pay her hospital bill, but “was grateful to Boy for his financial advice...which would in time make it possible for [him] to do better for Mrs. Dempster and to arrange a broader life for [himself]” (pg.114). Dunstan realizes that Mrs. Dempster is his top priority and that his social life is no longer relevant until she is taken care of.

Proof 4: Dunstan keeps the secrets of Leola and Boy\'s dysfunctional relationship from anyone else and never fights for the woman he once loved. Therefore, he never allows himself to be able to have the relationship with Leola that he once wanted; "If I spoke up for her I might find myself her champion, and a man who champions any woman against her husband had better be sure he means business” (pg.95).
Proof 5: During a discussion between Dunstan, Paul, and Boy, Dunstan is surprised that Boy and Paul have very little memory of the past. “I could hardly believe he spoke the truth, but as we talked on I had to accept it as a fact that he had so far edited his memory of his early days that the incident of the snowball had quite vanished from his mind. But had not Paul edited his memories so that only pain and cruelty remained? I began to wonder what I had erased from my own recollection” (pg.168). At this moment, Dunstan realized the negative effects of bottling up negative emotions because they can have negative effects on one\'s experiences, which is what happened to him.
Proof 6: While his obsession for secrets haunts him, Dunstan’s obsession with saints leads him to become more introvert and to ignore his exterior surroundings that leads him to his failure of friendship and accompaniment; “My preoccupation with saints was such that I could not keep it out of the conversation, and Boy was concerned for me ― ‘Watch that you don‘t get queer, Dunny’ he would say” (pg.78).
Proof 7: Dunstan becomes more aware of his obsessiveness with saints as he described his adventure across the Continent as a “mad mission, hunting up Uncumber in remote villages as well as in such easy and pleasant places as Beauvais and Wissant, and once positively identifying an image that was said to be Uncumber as Galla, the patroness of widows, who is also sometimes represented with a beard” (pg. 89).

Bibliography

Deane, P. (2012, July 11). Obsession–Good or bad? Creative or Destructive? Retrieved March 6, 2015, from https://philipdeane.wordpress.com/2012/07/11/obsessiongood-or-bad-creative-or-destructive/

Golden, C. (n.d.). The 12 Common Archetypes. Retrieved March 9, 2015, from http://www.soulcraft.co/essays/the_12_common_archetypes.html

Shakespeare, W. (199). The tragedy of Macbeth. Champaign, Ill.: Project Gutenberg.

Simpson, J. (1989). The Oxford English dictionary (2nd ed.). Oxford: Clarendon Press
Video Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OBTSSYkGdho