I have who has Grade 3
Emilee Spence, Hannah Turner, and Kayla Cardwell
Standards:

Multiply and divide within 100.
7. Fluently multiply and divide within 100, using strategies such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 × 5 = 40, one knows 40 ÷ 5 = 8) or properties of operations. By the end of Grade 3, know from memory all products of two one-digit numbers.

Solve problems involving the four operations, and identify and explain patterns in arithmetic.
8. Solve two-step word problems using the four operations. Represent these problems using equations with a letter standing for the unknown quantity. Assess the reasonableness of answers using mental computation and estimation strategies including rounding.

Use place value understanding and properties of operations to perform multi-digit arithmetic.
2. Fluently add and subtract within 1000 using strategies and algorithms based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
3. Multiply one-digit whole numbers by multiples of 10 in the range 10–90 (e.g., 9 × 80, 5 × 60) using strategies based on place value and properties of operations.

Develop understanding of fractions as numbers.
1. Understand a fraction 1/b as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction a/b as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.
3. Explain equivalence of fractions in special cases, and compare fractions by reasoning about their size.
a. Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, or the same point on a number line.
b. Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions, e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3). Explain why the fractions are equivalent, e.g., by using a visual fraction model.
c. Express whole numbers as fractions, and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers. Examples: Express 3 in the form 3 = 3/1; recognize that 6/1 = 6; locate 4/4 and 1 at the same point of a number line diagram.
d. Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning about their size. Recognize that comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, or









I have 7



Who has 3 x 4 = ? I have 12



Who has 40 ÷ 5 = ?



I have 8



Who has 5 x 50 = ?

























I have 250



Who has the reduced fraction of 2/4?
I have 1/2 is the reduced fraction



Who has 100 ÷ 2 = ? I have 50


Who has the fraction to represent the shaded area ?
I have ¼ is the shaded area



Who has 8 ÷ 4 = ? I have 2



Who has 5 x 8 = ?
I have 40


Who has the fraction to represent the shaded area ? I have ¾



Who has 9 x 0 = ?
I have 0



Who has the reduced fraction of 2/2? I have 1



Who has 60 ÷ 2 = ?

I have 30



Who has 2 x 3 = ? I have 6



Who has 3 x 11 = ?
I have 33



Who has ½ =, <, or > 2/4? I have ½ = 2/4



Who has 100 ÷ 4 = ?
I have 25



Who has 8 x  = 40? I have 5



Who has  x 9 = 72?
I have 8



Who has 141 + 127 = ? I have 268



Who has 35 x 5 = ?
I have 175




Who has 28 ÷ 4 = ? I have 7




Who has ¾ =, <, or > 2/3?

I have ¾ > 2/3




Who has 368 – 241 = ?
I have 127




Who has 9 x 9 = ?
I have 81



Who has the fraction of the shaded area ? I have 3/7



Who has 6 x 6 = ?
I have 36



Who has 50 ÷ 2 = ? I have 25


Who has the fraction of the shaded area
?
I have ½




Who has 8 x 5 = ? I have 40



Who has 200 +  = 800
I have 600



Who has 2/2 is =, <, or > 1 I have 2/2 = 1


Who has 620 – 420 = ?
I have 200



Who has 5 x 60 = ? I have 300


Who has the fraction of the shaded area ?
I have 2/6

Who has if a pizza was divided into 10 equal slices and someone ate 6, what would be the fraction of the leftover pizza?
I have 4/10



Who has 999 – 887 = ?
I have 112



Who has 9 x 10 =