How did Africans begin to conceptualize unity


November 6, 2014
Afro-American Studies
Framing Question 4
How did Africans begin to conceptualize unity in thought and action beyond national boundaries in the face of European and American imperialism?
Abstract:
By the late eighteenth and nineteenth century, Africans learned the techniques about how to resist slavery and how to form unity in thoughts and actions. Africans also being to conceptualize unity in thought and actions beyond national boundaries in the face of European and American imperialism with “The Practice of Diaspora,” which enabled Africans to begin to see themselves as part of the African world. They did this even though they already struggled against local social, economic, political, and cultural racial oppressions. Africans grasped many techniques such as resistance form white people, United States and Western Hemisphere.
Critical Review of Scholarship:
In order to fully understand and answer this question, I will be using information from the power point provided by Dr.Carr and information from his lecture. I will also be using information from the readings of different books. Books called Black Movements in America , The Atlas of African-American History and Politics and Of AfriA will assist me with answering this question.
Discussion:
In reference to the question at hand, African begin to conceptualize unity in thought and action beyond national boundaries in the face of European and American imperialism due to their diversity. In his novel, Wole Soyinka stated that “Africa is more a concept than a bounded space, which means, in turn: more ‘concepts’ than simply one.” Africans began to see themselves as having meaning as opposed to just an occupation of an area. Because Africa is so diverse, it is very accepting and tolerant of a wide range of other cultures. Africa has come to host many diverse cultures due to colonialism. Colonialism has contributed to the misplaced geography of the African continent. Since they have been integrated for so long, Africans have embraced this advantage in order to solve developmental problems. This allows them to easily attack issues regarding unity because Africans embrace others with solely open arms.
Industrial labor served as a “pull” dynamic in African migration patterns. Africans were also able to conceptualize unity in thought and action beyond national boundaries by the creation of music, dance, spoken and written texts that preserve and recognize the existence of specific icons, shrines, and rituals (locally and internationally).
“First, we are still using languages that are not ours, or not in any meaningful sense African. For the moment the most widely used of these languages are not merely not ours; they also happen to be the cultural property of Europeans and Arabs whose long-range projects were intended to dehumanize Africans as a way of enhancing their own claims to human and superhuman status. A certain ambivalence among Africans using such languages is logical. It is also a sign that we shall outgrow these languages—if and when we get organized.” This quote basically explains Africans have picked up things from other people to grow the African community. Even though these languages do not belong to Africans. They used these languages to try and degrade Africans but Africans picking up this language became somewhat logical.
Further Questions:
Do Africans still allow the same things to be done to them today? How have Africans overcome such unfair treatment?