Educated While In Prison

English 101

April 9, 2014

Educated While In Prison

“The Allegory of the Cave” by Plato and “A Homemade Education” by Malcolm X are

very similar to each other. In both writings they are communicating how they were detained in

some sort of way and how instruction was seen as a way out. The thought of mistreatment safety

and flexibility are available in both writings. In both writings they were held detained and had no

control of the circumstances. They opposed to everything to start with. Be that as it may, the

detainees soon understood that their flexibility was through instruction. In Plato's content we

figure out how a couple of detainees got instructed about the outside world from aggregate

haziness. In the mean time, Malcolm X clarifies to us how he chooses to use his time in jail to

better instruct himself. Both Plato and Malcolm X outline their voyage of training through a dim

zone to their opportunity of seeing the world and instructing themselves about it through their

eyes.

In "The Allegory of the Cave" the text opens up with "Behold! Human beings living in an

underground den, which has a mouth open toward the light and reaching all along the den; here

they have been from their childhood, and have their legs and necks chained so they cannot move,

and can only see before them, being prevented by the chains from turning around their heads.

Above and behind them a fire blazing at a distance, and between the fire and the fire and the

prisoners there is a raised way; and you will see, if you look, a low wall built along the way, like

the screen which marionette players have in front of them, over which they show the

puppets(1113)". Here Plato talks about how the detainees have been held since youth with

chains. Their legs and necks are bound so they can't turn around to see what is behind them.

Placed directly behind them is a fire that is bursting and in the middle of the greater part of this is

a raised screen like way, which has manikins for the detainees to see. The detainees are in a dull

zone and just light accommodated them is the flame. In "A Homemade Education" Malcolm X

talks on a night in jail. He states “When I progressed to really serious reading, every night at

about ten p.m. I would be outraged with the “lights out”. It always seemed to catch me right in

the middle of something engrossing. Fortunately, right outside my door was a corridor light that

cast a glow into my room. The glow was enough to read by, once my eyes adjusted to it. So

when “lights out” came, I would sit on the floor where I could continue my reading in that glow

(717)”. X wasn't permitted to peruse after specific hours while in jail, ten p.m. So he had no

decision however to stay himself into one corner of his cell and read from somewhat light that

might sparkle into his cell. Not just was X breaking the principles and opposing to what was

befalling him. He was instructing himself and attempting to bring about a noticeable

improvement. Much the same as in Plato's content how the detainees were held to one particular

spot in a dull zone with sticks a bit light generally so was Malcolm X. He was limited to one spot

in his cell after ten p.m. so hopefully he could keep perusing after "lights out". In both writings

they were held in dim ranges with simply a little light sparkling toward them to help proceed

their training. Then again, their training does not end once they are free.

In Plato's content we read “Anyone who has common sense will remember the

bewilderments of the eyes are of two kinds, and arise from two causes, either from coming out of

the light or from going into the light, which is true of the minds eye, quite as much as of the

bodily eye; and he who remembers this when he sees any one whose vision is perplexed and

weak, will not be ready to laugh; he will first ask whether that soul of a man has come out