Alcohol related crime drops after introduction of new licensing laws
(08 February 2006 16:06)
Alcohol related crime has fallen in the months after the introduction of
new licensing laws in England and Wales, according to the latest Home
Office figures.
Figures from the six-week Alcohol Misuse Enforcement Campaign (AMEC), which
ran from November through the Christmas period, showed violent crime was
down 11%.
[pic]Critics of the licensing liberalisation, which began on the 24
November, had predicted longer opening hours would lead to soaring levels
of violence as binge drinkers drank around the clock.
However, the new figures show this has not been the case.
Serious violent crime related to alcohol fell 21% during the period, which
was the biggest drop of all previous alcohol crackdowns.
Mark Hastings, director of Communications at the British Beer & Pub
Association, said: "Clearly, the combination of flexible opening hours and
law enforcement is having a positive impact. The projections of Government
and the industry have proved far closer to the truth than the prophesies of
the peddlers of doom and gloom."
Culture secretary Tessa Jowell said: "Thanks to the new licensing laws, the
police and local authorities have joined forces to use tougher powers to
deal with the problem [disorder] at source."
By Chris Druce






In 08 February 2006 new licensing law was introduced. According to the Home
Office figures alcohol related crime has fallen in the months after the
introduction of new laws in England and Wales,. Moreover serious violent
crime related to alcohol fell 21% during the period, because of longer
opening of the pubs. As Mark Hastings, director of communication at British
Beer and pub association, said: "clearly, the combination of flexible
opening hours and law enforcement is having a positive impact. The
projections of Government and the industry have proved far closer to the
truth than the prophesies of the peddlers of doom and gloom."
Culture secretary Tessa Jowell said: "Thanks to the new licensing laws, the
police and local authorities have joined forces to use tougher powers to
deal with the problem [disorder] at However it is still a problem for a
many people.

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What alcohol does to your mind and body
The immediate effects of alcohol on the human body are fairly apparent, but
have you ever thought about the other side-effects? We don't just mean
headaches and nausea - alcohol is thought to be highly calorific and can
pose long term threats to our health.
. Why does alcohol seem to make me put on weight?
. What are the good and bad effects?
. New research about alcohol
Why does alcohol seem to make me put on weight?
It's just a question of maths! Approximately 3,500 calories will produce
one pound of fat. Alcohol is full of calories, so, two or three G&Ts a day
for four weeks will fatten you up by about 4lbs.
|Drink |Number of calories |
|1 pint of beer or lager |180 - 300 |
|1 vodka and orange |140 |
|1 gin and tonic |140 |
|1 whisky and dry ginger |145 |
|1 rum and coke |145 |
|1 glass of white wine |85 |


Even worse news is that alcohol has no essential nutrients such as vitamins
and minerals.
[pic]
What are the good and bad effects?
Alcohol affects everyone's health in different ways - but the good things
are still outweighed by the bad.
Mind and emotions
Alcohol is a drug that depresses the brain. We all know the cheeriness that
can come with the first drink, but alcohol can actually cause severe
depression. 'Letting go', another effect which can initially be pleasant,
gets some of us into difficulties, because when our petty or angry side
gets exaggerated by alcohol, friendships or marriages can be threatened.
Does alcohol improve sex? Alcohol can certainly increase our desire and, by
reducing tension, enhance our enjoyment. In men however, large doses of
alcohol block the nerves necessary for erection. If this happens once or
twice, a man can become worried about his sexual ability - which is a sure
way to impair erections from then on - unless confidence is re-established
with a sympathetic partner. In addition, the loss of inhibition that
accompanies alcohol intake can lead to a failure to consider the